Can we repair the brain? The promise of stem cell technologies for treating Parkinson’s disease

Can we repair the brain? The promise of stem cell technologies for treating Parkinson's disease
Cell replacement may play an increasing role in alleviating the motor symptoms of Parkinson’s disease (PD) in future. Writing in a special supplement to the Journal of Parkinson’s Disease, experts describe how newly developed stem cell technologies could be used to treat the disease and discuss the great promise, as well as the significant challenges, of stem cell treatment.

Personalized stem cell treatment may offer relief for multiple sclerosis

Personalized stem cell treatment may offer relief for multiple sclerosis
Scientists have shown in mice that skin cells re-programmed into brain stem cells, transplanted into the central nervous system, help reduce inflammation and may be able to help repair damage caused by multiple sclerosis (MS).

Discovery may advance neural stem cell treatments for brain disorders

Discovery may advance neural stem cell treatments for brain disorders
New research reveals a novel gene regulatory system that may advance stem cell therapies and gene-targeting treatments for neurological diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, and mental health disorders that affect cognitive abilities.

Paraplegic rats walk and regain feeling after stem cell treatment

Paraplegic rats walk and regain feeling after stem cell treatment
Paralyzed rats implanted with engineered tissue containing human stem cells were able to walk independently and regained sensory perception in their hind legs and tail. The implanted rats also show some degree of healing in their spinal cords. The research demonstrates the great potential of stem cells to treat spinal cord injury.

Stem cell therapy for lung fibrosis conditions

Stem cell therapy for lung fibrosis conditions
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World first: Stem cell treatment for lethal STAT1 gene mutation shows ‘disappointing,’ but promising results

World first: Stem cell treatment for lethal STAT1 gene mutation shows 'disappointing,' but promising results
Dr. Okada, who first discovered the STAT1 gain of function mutation in 2011, says that “Overall, this result is disappointing — but the fact five patients were cured proves that treatment with stem cells can work, and we now need to learn from these 15 individual cases.” In response, the researchers have made several proposals for improving this treatment. In addition, the chemotherapy...

Unproven stem cell ‘therapy’ blinds three patients at Florida clinic

Unproven stem cell 'therapy' blinds three patients at Florida clinic
Three people with macular degeneration were blinded after undergoing an unproven stem cell treatment that was touted as a clinical trial in 2015 at a clinic in Florida. Within a week following the treatment, the patients experienced a variety of complications, including vision loss, detached retinas and hemorrhage. They are now blind.

Sub-set of stem cells found to minimize risks when used to treat damaged hearts

Sub-set of stem cells found to minimize risks when used to treat damaged hearts
Scientists use mathematical modeling to simulate human mesenchymal stem cell delivery to a damaged heart and found that using one sub-set of these stem cells minimizes the risks associated with this therapy. The study represents a development in novel strategies to repair and regenerate heart muscle and could improve stem cell treatments for heart attack patients.

Stem cell treatment for Lou Gehrig’s disease may be safe

Stem cell treatment for Lou Gehrig's disease may be safe
A phase II clinical trial in people with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), or Lou Gehrig’s disease, suggests that transplanting human stem cells into the spinal cord may be done safely. While the study was not designed to determine whether the treatment was effective, researchers noted that it did not slow down the progression of the disease.

When it comes to developing stem cell treatments, seeing is half the battle

When it comes to developing stem cell treatments, seeing is half the battle
A new MRI contrast agent may help in developing stem cell treatments. While still early in development, stem and therapeutic cells may one day offer effective treatments against diseases, particularly cancer. But one major hurdle in developing these treatments is an inability to effectively monitor them once inside the body.